Month: October 2016

Language and Identity Perception in Nazım Hikmet’s Poetry during Exile Years by Hülya Bayrak Akyıldız

INTRODUCTION In this paper, Nazım Hikmet’s poetry in exile years, from 1951 to his death in 1963, is examined in terms of identity projection and the role of language in this.     Nazım Hikmet is one of the greatest poets of our age. His greatness lies in his ability to meet universality and the search of novelty with the contemporary and universal interpretations of the conventional. His poetry, meeting futuristic effects with socialist realistic, Marxist art and then with the voice of folk poems, gets the final touch by the poet’s distinctive sensitivity. This is why “earth”, “land” and “Turkish” are the key concepts in Nazım Hikmet. Before examining his language and identity perception, let’s take a global look on the relation between language and identity /culture. Kramsch defines communities of language users and how the use of language affects viewing the world and thus identity: People who identify themselves as members of a social group (family, neighborhood, professional or ethnih affiliation, nation) acquire common ways of viewing the world through their interactions with other members of the same group. These views are reinforced through institutions like the family, the school, the workplace, the church, the government and other sites of socialization throughout their lives. Common attitudes, beliefs and values are reflected in the way members of the group use language – for example, what they choose to say or...

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RICHARD AYOADE’S THE DOUBLE AND THE PROBLEMS OF ADAPTING DOSTOEVSKY by Arijit Mukhopadhyay

The initial credits of the film The Double(2013)by British filmmaker Richard Ayoadedeclare clearly that the film has been ‘inspired by’ Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novella The Double (1846). The conspicuous use of the word ‘inspired’ might have been to suggest at the very beginning to the viewer that what he is about to see is not exactly what one may call a proper interpreted ‘adaptation’ of the novella, rather something inspired by (and close to) its central idea. By doing so, the makers perhaps allowed themselves the freedom of taking more liberties in interpreting the idea. When the source material is the fiction of such writers as Dostoevsky, or the likes of Kafka or Marquez, who have constantly dealt with the problems of the modern rationalist society and how they might affect a non-conforming individual psychologically and morally, it becomes all the more difficult to contend with the possibility of having to deal with the scrutiny that comes with an adaptation proper. So in that sense, Ayoade allowed himself much breathing space on all accounts insofar as ‘interpreting’ the novel is concerned without having to stay completely loyal to the plot of the source material. Yet, even so, it has to be remembered that a visual medium is, at the end of the day, a visual medium, and the restrictions offered, due to its inherent directness of portrayal, to imagination (of the...

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Preethi Athreya’s Conditions of Carriage, of Collectivity by Madhushree Basu

  To carry what? Chennai-based choreographer Preethi Athreya’s[1] latest work Conditions of Carriage started as a ‘jumping project’. The jumps were to take place in and out of a square pit created by late visual artist Dashrath Patel at SPACES, which is at present a venue for artistic practices and performances in Chennai. The process took off with an open invitation to performance practitioners from India and Srilanka. The current title came later from the tagline to be found in boarding passes for aircrafts. It can be seen as an ironical name for this work, because what this work deals with as ‘objects’ of carriage, are far from the dead weights, which are referred in the original context of this phrase. In her process of searching for an “honest, functional body”, Preethi aspires to deal with not simply that body, but the mind behind it, and more interestingly as well as more abstractly what can possibly be called the ‘soul’ that dreams of and drives that body to fly in the air, or holds it firmly and almost wisely rooted to the ground. Even though this way of looking at bodies make the underlying process infinitely more complex than binary logic that machines are prone to follow, still, certain images in this work do imitate machines. Parts of this piece have been compared to ball-sockets, circuits, clocks, inside of...

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A JOURNEY BACK IN TIME by Ananda Srestha

Just fed up with the hectic pace of life in the teeming Kathmandu metropolis, three of us, old classmates, got together and decided to go on a little trip to a medieval town called Bandipur. A friend of ours, a native of the place, had told us so much about it that at long last we set out for the weekend to discover the town – a place where old Nepal lives on! Bandipur, the very name for us seemed to spell magic! We were soon to learn that there is a great deal of truth in the belief that time stops in Bandipur. That a tiny piece of old Nepal lives on in this cool, cobbled Newar settlement. Our journey to Bandipur branched off the Prithvi Highway, about two kilometers west of Dumre, which we reached by catching the local bus. From there, in less than an hour we reached our destination. If we felt like a bit of adventure, we could have done the two plus hours steep climb up from Dumre. But with not much time on our hands – and to be honest age not being on our side – we decided otherwise. So, in about three hours bus ride from Kathmandu and a few minutes’ walk, we  suddenly found ourselves a hundred years back in time – right in the medieval town of Bandipur. Vehicles...

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Nation of Unhappiness by Moe Thet Han

  1) People of the nation of unhappiness eat the fruits of unhappiness, which grow everywhere throughout the country. The official language of the nation of unhappiness lacks the word ”happiness”. The unhappy people enjoy the fruits of unhappiness and obtain the vitamin of unhappiness. Unhappiness. Unhappiness fruit human being nation. Unhappiness.   2) The other side launched a rocket, making a loud sound of explosion: the pieces of ground splintered: legs, hands, limbs, heads flew into the sky: everywhere there were blood: people were rushing in a panic: trees were also in tears. The explosion of rockets, guns filled the whole place. Legs, hands, limbs, heads flew into the sky. The ground with serious wounds was praying continuously that it would die as fast as it could. The shells which ate blood and lives were cast into Buddha images and worshipped. The shells of guns are still showing their utility as flower pots. Afterwards rockets and shells fell with loud noise, breaking the ground into pieces.   3) A party of international healthcare was preparing to cure a war victim who escaped from the danger of war. They did not understand his language. He spoke not much. His voice was faint and weak like that of a wounded animal. The doctors scanned his brain before operating on him. There, in his head, are over 60 years’ sound of...

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