Month: October 2017

‘The memoir is very frustrating. I can’t seem to explain what happened to me.’ – Vijay Seshadri

Vijay Seshadri is a poet, essayist, and literary critic. He was born in India, and lives in the US, having moved there at the age of five. He is the author of Wild Kingdom (1996); The Long Meadow (2003), which won the James Laughlin Award; and 3 Sections (2013), which won the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. He has worked as an editor at the New Yorker, and has taught at Sarah Lawrence College, where he currently directs the graduate non-fiction writing program. We managed to get a hold of him when he came to attend Dhaka Lit Fest in...

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Ramayana Series by Natasha Sarkar

As early as the sixteenth century, the Ramayana is revealed through the eyes of two women with contrasting backgrounds, Molla – a potter’s daughter from Andhra Pradesh, and Chandrabati – a Brahmin’s daughter from Bengal. Through Molla’s lens, one can view gory, battlefield scenes, while Chandrabati’s focal point rests on the pregnancies of the key female characters, and also on how the heroine rather than the hero, is destined to destroy the villain ( in the Artwork “Female Gaze”). Sita is, in fact, given a more heroic character, originally in a Tamil folktale, and later in Tulsidas’s Ramcharitmanas. Thus,...

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Artworks by Nosheen Ahmad

My journey through art has been exploring and playing with the elements of design.  The elements of design are a dot, line, shape, form, color and texture. My aim has been to discover as many mediums and techniques – to get to know the character of each medium and to select an image accordingly. My inspiration has always been nature and its creations. I will start with a pencil drawing of my brother ‘Ahmad’, as a baby. Through the subtle rendering of a pencil I have tried to portray the softness and innocence of a baby. Moving on to...

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Urban Text by Imran Firdaus

We had trouble deciding if we should tag this collection as photography or a photo story. In reality these are images and text; but they also do tell some kind of a story. Or stories. Multiple stories – sometimes appearing to be in sync, sometimes going in different directions. But what catches our eye is that they exist, around us. They contain traces of lives and thoughts of people who exist alongside us. And we may never know them or meet them, the traces we see, we experience. Imran Firdaus documents these traces. He prefers to call this series...

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